XBox Modded: Part 2

A while back I bought and modified an original Microsoft XBox - I modded it because as it turns out the DVD drive is on it's last legs, which I would learn when I picked up a copy of the Simpsons: Hit and Run, and had to play it on the 360. I bought this fucking thing, I want to use it!

Yesteday I spent a bit checking through old hard disks, and came upon a few potential candidates. A 40GB, an 80GB, and a 160GB. Being greedy, I decided to try the 160GB first. No matter what I did, I couldn't get it to stop red-ringing, so I decided to try hot-swap the drives and did a fresh install on the new drive, but it RROD'd as soon as I restarted. I tried switching between "master" and "cable select" on the drive, and nothing worked.

The drive is a Maxtor D33019, which is supposed to work. Maybe I'm doing something wrong?

I decided to give the 80GB a go, and it worked second go... I needed the drive on CS, instead of master. I used an install disk to put the EvoX dashboard on, copied over a game image (using a tool called Qwix to FTP it) and it's worked fine since. I can only suspect that the 160GB didn't work, because I don't have an LBA BIOS installed, which is apparently a requirement for drives over a certain size. Since it's working, I don't want to risk bricking the bloody thing so I'll leave it be.

It looks like I'm stuck downloading images of games I want to play, because ripping them with DVD2Xbox takes forever, presumably due to the failing DVD-ROM.

Horsham, VIC, Australia fwaggle

Published:


Modified:

Never

Filed under:


Location:

Horsham, VIC, Australia

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Hard Disk Spelunking

I brought home about four IDE hard disks from the US, at least one of which I hoped to use in my Xbox console if they still functioned adequately. Unfortunately, I failed to take into account that I don't have easy access to a computer capable of reading them, so I had to cobble something together.

I managed to misplace the sole 40-pin IDE cable I had left, so I asked Dad if he had one. He did one better, and brought around an old PC he had laying on the back porch that he'd been meaning to throw out - it's my problem. I fired it up and it's an old Pentium III box with Windows XP - that'd do for inspecting any of the disks that are FAT32 formatted.

Expecting to find lots of interesting old stuff, like old text files I wrote and things like that, I hooked the first hard disk up - starting from largest to smallest. Turn the machine back on and... nothing. Looks like it died? I spent about 30 minutes trying to get it to boot again, but it looks like it's given up the ghost. I'm not sure if anything on it is still worth something to retro computing collectors (old Wintel machines aren't interesting to me whatsoever) but I may just end up throwing the whole thing out after all. I took an IDE cable out of it and shifted it off the bench.

Next up I pulled out the old P4 that I removed from Grandma's house when we replaced it with a laptop, but it turns out it only has a floppy port and SATA, no IDE ports! Bummer. I eventually cobbled together another old P4, which had a dead power supply, and a FreeBSD installation on it, and used that to inspect things.

I set the machine up on the network with the disk in it, configured Samba to share /mnt with everyone, and mounted each disk in turn on it then used my laptop to have a look. I found... zip. Nothing really interesting at all on most of the disks. I did back up a couple of Python scripts I wrote that I'm not sure if I have other copies of or not, but that was it. How disappointing!

The 160GB hard disk works well (the largest disk I brought back), so I'll put it on the Xbox. The others, I might see if anyone else wants them, so I used dd to write random bullshit over all of them. The 80GB disk took about 2 hours to scrub, and the others took less (but not as much less, considering they were slower). I don't know if there's much on there that's personal that would be interesting to anyone, but better to at least pretend I maintain some sort of opsec.

Now all I have to do is dig out the Xbox and try set up the new disk in it.

Horsham, VIC, Australia fwaggle

Published:


Modified:

Never

Filed under:


Location:

Horsham, VIC, Australia

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Second Christmas!

Mum, Dad, my sisters, and my sister's kids came out today for "Second Christmas", which Sabriena points out is actually our third, but to me that just seems greedy. We exchanged gifts for the kids, where Duncan finally got the Brainsaw he'd been asking for the whole time we were in the USA.

We apparently managed to track down, completely by accident, the "Monster High" doll Elly had been wanting for a while now, which worked out pretty good that it was just sitting on the shelf at Target waiting for us to buy. Unfortunately it was also at K-mart, for $3 cheaper, but for $3 I wasn't about to go return it and buy a different one.

Cody, we weren't sure what to buy, as he's at a rather difficult age... but he just got a gaming laptop and a Steam account, so we figured we could do no wrong buying him a Steam gift card. It seems that EB are now selling the same ones Coles does, where they're priced in AUD and you don't actually get the face value in USD when you redeem it, but he had just enough for the game he wanted anyway so it worked out.

We had a pretty good lunch, where I ate far too much, and then sat around for a few hours before everyone went home.

Horsham, VIC, Australia fwaggle

Published:


Modified:

Never

Filed under:


Location:

Horsham, VIC, Australia

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Don't Starve Together: Servers

The documentation for headless servers for this game is fucking awful.

Sabriena and her sister were playing this game during our stay in the USA, and she asked if I could set up a dedicated server for them. I had a look and the game supports Linux, and recently they added a "null renderer" which effectively gave you a headless dedicated server for it. So it should be easy enough to do, right?

I read two different guides, one on the wiki and one on Linode (there appears to be no official documentation), and both were wrong. Both mentioned setting up a server.ini (one in the "cluster directory", and one in the game configuration directory itself), and the game summarily ignored both attempts. I couldn't set a password, change the server name, or any of the other settings. I did manage to get the game server to start using the cluster key, so I knew I was looking in the right place.

In the end I ended up starting a server myself, locally, and trying to copy the configuration from that. When I did that I noticed that the settings I added were placed into a file called cluster.ini, so I simply made a couple of changes to that file and uploaded it to ~/.klei/DoNotStarveTogether/Cluster_1, and lo and behold the server worked as I'd expect it to.

By the way, the wiki mentions a workaround for Debian Wheezy, which links to files that are 404ed. Through the magic of git, you can pull them out of an old commit, such as:

https://github.com/GameServerManagers/LinuxGSM/blob/21be3ad81ead148c82caa447e15584626bf6b4dd/Insurgency/dependencies/libc.so.6

Horsham, VIC, Australia fwaggle

Published:


Modified:

Never

Filed under:


Location:

Horsham, VIC, Australia

Navigation: Older Entry Newer Entry